September 30, 2009

Tell Me What to Read: Round 4

Unbelievably, one month of school is done. September is over tonight.

So, time for the next round of Tell Me What to Read (this is, unbelievably, Round 4).

It can be any genre, any age level, and have been published last week or three hundred years ago. You can pick it because it's a book that everyone should read or because it changed your life or because it is great literature or just because it entertained you. You can DEFINITELY suggest the same book you suggested last month.

Here's how it goes:
  1. Comment with the title of one book you think I should read (any book you want). One title only, please, lest my brain explode.
  2. I'll select one comment at random and announce it on the blog later this week
  3. On the off-chance that I've already read the book you select, I'll contact you and ask for a follow-up suggestion (make sure there is a way to contact you either by blog or email).
  4. I'll get a copy of the book and read it by the end of October.
  5. I'll write a review of it here. Even if I hate the book, I will not hate you.
And. . .go!

42 comments:

  1. The Gerbil Farmer's Daughter. Oh, so delightful--a memoir.

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  2. The Zookeeper's Wife by Diane Ackerman

    Only because I have it sitting on my nightstand waiting to be read and would like know what other's think of it as well. I do think I'll like it though so I feel comfortable recommending it.

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  3. Follow the River
    by James Alexander Thom
    Good Book :)
    Laura Muir
    loolamuir@msn.com

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  4. Have you read The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo yet? I will keep suggesting it until you do!

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  5. Okay, I have to read anything with "gerbil" in it, especially if it's a memoir.

    Shelly, I'll read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo! I've heard nothing but good things about it.

    But for you, Janssen, I submit The King's Flower, by Mitsumasa Anno. It's a picture book from the 70s, but it's my very favorite from my childhood. The illustrations are so wonderful.

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  6. Miss Rumphius! It's one of the most lovely children's books I've ever read, and if your library doesn't have it, please order a copy! It's by Barbara Cooney and her illustrations are so gorgeous.

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  7. Team of Rivals by Doris Kearns Goodwin. I'd even forgive you if you didn't finish it in one month, but you really do have to read it some time.

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  8. Although I'm sure you've read it (you seem to have read everything I suggest...). But: House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros. Another coming of age/YA but with mature themes. I love, love, LOVE this book.

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  9. okay, once again, I'm going to tell you to read "the magician's assistant" by ann patchett.

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  10. The Hour I First Believed by Wally Lamb.

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  11. Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton.

    xox

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  12. 11 Birthdays by Wendy Mass. Juvenile fiction, but a cute story...

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  13. Have you read the Silverwing series by Kenneth Oppel (published first novel at 17) ? Starts with Silverwing, an endearing YA novel about a young Silverwing bat and his journey to find his family, his courage and faith in himself!

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  14. I'll play along!
    The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Shaffer and Barrows. So sweet...

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  15. Same as last month...The Kite Runner.

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  16. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen. Sorry if you've already read it! I loved this book, it's such a great story.

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  17. Veil or Roses
    by Laura Fitzgerald.

    Just because I really liked it.

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  18. I almost suggested a childbirth book just to be funny but that will have to wait... then I'll throw a million books your way.

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  19. Okay Janssen, PLEASE read Poisonwood Bible. :)

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  20. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer

    I haven't read it yet[I have it on hold at the library], but I hear it's amazing. I'd like your review of it!

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  21. Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Murrilier (sp?). It made me love fantasy again. And tall red-headed Brits . . .

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  22. The Final Empire (Mistborn Book 1) by Brandon Sanderson

    Epic fantasy for the win. :)

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  23. Yeah, I caught your request post this month! Did I ever tell you what a fun idea this is that you do?

    I think you should read: North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell

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  24. Cutting for Stone
    by Abraham Verghese

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  25. I'd like to suggest The Help. Fantastic story and offers some interesting insight and historical information.

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  26. The Opposite of Love by Julie Buxbaum. I enjoyed it.

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  27. I am going to be slightly cruel and suggest you read The Goats by Brock Cole. It's not a BAD book, but one of the WEIRD books I'm reading for grad school. I'm interested in hearing what someone who wasn't required to read it and then analyze it to death thinks

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  28. OK- no matter if I get picked or not, ....you need to read...POISON STUDY- (I read this thinking...Janssen would like this!)

    Loved it!

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  29. Julie & Julia, by Julie Powell!

    (I will forgo The Poisonwood Bible this month in favor of that only because I saw that the other girl who keeps recommending it already did, and because I'm finishing up J&J right now and adore it.)

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  30. The Penderwicks on Gardam Street by Jeanne Birdsall.

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  31. "These is My Words" by Nancy Turner. I'm halfway through and really enjoying it. Written in diary form -- not my favorite, but it works very well for this story of the post Civil War Arizona Territory.

    TGM

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  32. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo makes me think of The Girl with the Silver Eyes by Willo Davis Roberts, so I think you should read that (the latter). I think it's out of print, but if your school doesn't have it you can borrow mine. I haven't read it in years and years, so have no idea how it stands up.

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  33. You like to cook, right? I just finished My Life in France by Julia Child and really enjoyed it. She was a really interesting, hardworking person and I learned a lot of things about her (and writing a cookbook!) that I didn't know before.

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  34. Gonna stick to my guns. ;)

    DAUGHTER OF THE FOREST by Juliet Marillier

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  35. angle of repose, wallace stegner.

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  36. I'm always impressed when I've read the books on the list and am frantically searching for others. Poisonwood Bible has been sitting on my nightstand for months along with the Kite Runner. Maybe I should get on that?

    I shall recommend...(assuming it's not too late!) Walk Across America. I love this book.

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  37. Mom just finished My Life in France and Julie and Julia. She really enjoyed both of them. (They're in the stack to read piled next to my bed.) Mom was a little "disturbed" by the language in Julie and Julia but that it fit the story. Not really making a suggestion, just reinforcing others'.

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